If a public transport injury has set you back, we'll help you move forward

If your life, or the life of a loved one, has been affected by a public transport accident, we can help. If your injuries were caused by another driver, cyclist, pedestrian or any other road user, you may be entitled to claim compensation.

You can make a No Win, No Fee road injury compensation claim with the help and support of a personal injury solicitor.

With over 75,000 bus, coach and train injuries every year, you are not alone

In 2022, there were 74,379 injuries on buses and coaches on Britain's roads (gov.uk).

There were 9,839 injuries on mainline train routes, and 4,572 injuries on the London Underground (orr.gov.uk).

If you decide to make a public transport accident injury claim, your road accident solicitor will take you through every step of the claims process. Your solicitor will be with you until you win your claim and get the compensation you need to move forward.

See also:

Road accident claims

Train accident claims

Am I eligible for public transport injury compensation?

You will be able to claim compensation if you've been injured or diagnosed with an illness in the last three years and it wasn't your fault.

Use our injury claim calculator to find out if you can claim. Or you can call 0800 376 1001 to speak to a specialist advisor. Find out in minutes if you have a claim.

What if I was partly to blame?

Liability for an accident often involves fault on both sides.

In our recent 2024 Road Injury Claimant Survey, 5.24% of injured road users thought they could be partially to blame for their accident.

You may still be able to claim compensation even if your actions may have contributed to the accident. Claims where there is fault on both sides (contributory negligence) are often resolved with a split liability agreement.

Read more:

Can I claim if I feel I was partly responsible for my accident?

How long do I have to start a public transport injury claim?

In most cases, you have up to 3 years from the date of your accident or injury to start a claim.

For an injured child, the three-year limitation period begins on their 18th birthday, giving them until they are 21 to start a claim.

What if the driver was uninsured or untraceable?

If the driver responsible for the injury is either uninsured or untraceable, a claim can be pursued through the Motor Insurers' Bureau (MIB).

The MIB is an independent that pays road accident compensation to the victims of uninsured or untraced (unidentified) drivers.

Read more:

Claiming compensation through the MIB

How much compensation can I claim for a public transport accident injury?

The amount of money you could claim for your injury will depend on:

  • the seriousness of your injury, and
  • any financial losses or costs you have incurred.

At the start of your claim, your solicitor will consider the many ways your injuries have affected your life. Your solicitor will take these considerations into account to calculate the correct compensation award.

Public transport accident injury compensation calculator

Get an accurate compensation estimate (including for multiple injuries), confirm your legal position, and check if you have a No Win, No Fee claim.

Updated May 2024 Compensation Calculator v3.04

General damages

General damages are awarded for pain, suffering and loss of amenity (PSLA).

Awards for general damages are set by the Judicial College (judiciary.uk) and published in their guidelines for personal injury awards.

How is compensation calculated if I have multiple injuries?

Special damages

Special damages are awarded to compensate you for any costs or losses you've incurred or might incur as a result of your accident. These costs might include loss of earnings, or any other out of pocket expenses.

Special damages may also be awarded for medical treatments or procedures that you might need to treat your public transport injury, including pain medication and psychological support.

Read more:

A complete list of recoverable losses in a personal injury claim

Psychological harm after a road accident

Have you been mentally or emotionally affected by a road accident? You are not alone.

According to our 2024 Road Injury Claimant Survey, 32.47% of injured road users suffered a psychological injury, 78.53% of these alongside a physical injury.

An accident on public transport can result in debilitating anxiety or phobias, such as agoraphobia (fear of crowded spaces) and PTSD.

Your solicitor will help to ensure you recieve suitable compensation for the diagnosed psychological harm you have suffered, to support your recovery and provide funding for therapies that may not be accessible on the NHS your area.

Our compensation calculator can estimate your compensation for psychological injuries. Or you can call us on 0800 376 1001 to speak to a specialist advisor.

Common public transport injuries

Trains

On the railway network, slips, trips and falls were the cause of 63% of injuries in 2014/15. These may have been caused by spillages or litter not being appropriately cleaned on floors or platforms.

Injuries when boarding or alighting from the train were also reported. Being caught in closing doors, or trapping fingers as defective doors slammed shut maybe some of the injuries. Faulty or poorly-labelled steps from the train to the platform may cause passengers to trip and fall as they dismount from the train at their destination.

Luggage falling from overhead racks is also a cause of head injuries.

Less common injuries that compensation may also be claimed for include cuts from damaged surfaces including seats and tables with exposed sharp edges.

See also:

Bus or coach accident claims

Slip, trip and fall injury claims

Cut and laceration injury claims

Buses

Of those injured while travelling by bus, more than 87% of the injuries were reported as being non-collision transport accidents. These are likely to be falls caused by bus drivers accelerating or braking heavily, while people are standing rather than safely seated. Accidents also occur when passengers are boarding or alighting from buses, mainly where the bus drives off before the passenger is seated.

Ferries and watercraft

Although ferry operators cannot control rough seas, operators do have a duty of care to take all reasonable precautions to protect the safety of passengers. This includes securing anything that could move during the journey and the provision of life rafts and life jackets.

Collisions at sea are infrequent; however, ferry passengers have been injured when ships have collided with harbour walls when docking. Whiplash injuries may be sustained by sudden impact, and sprains and bruising may result from falling.

See also:

Whiplash injury claims

Claiming compensation for accidents on public transport

All carriers and other companies responsible for public transport, including bus, train, ship and airline operators, have a duty of care to protect passengers and comply with applicable health and safety standards.

Bringing a public transport-related claim can become complex if a number of different organisations are involved. For example, the rail network involves separate companies responsible for operating the trains, platforms and tracks. A solicitor will determine which party (or parties) is responsible for the accident.

What happened?

Public transport accident injury claims are usually referred to as road traffic accident (RTA) claims. Click on the icons below to learn more:

No win, no fee public transport accident injury compensation claims

With no win, no fee, you can claim public transport accident injury compensation without financial risk. If your claim isn't successful, you pay nothing. If you win, you only pay a pre-agreed percentage of your compensation.

Find out more about how no win, no fee claims work

Get expert advice now

Interested in talking to a road accident specialist about your claim?

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  • No obligation to claim

Call 0800 376 1001

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Citations

Source: (reviewed: 08/12/2023)

Chris Salmon, Director

Author:
Chris Salmon, Director