If a hospital negligence injury has set you back, we'll help you move forward

If your life, or the life of a loved one, has been affected by hospital dehydration, we can help. If your injuries were caused by the negligence of a doctor, nurse, midwife or other medical professional, you may be entitled to claim compensation.

Compensation claims for hospital dehydration often arise when inadequate patient care leads to serious health declines, addressing the need for immediate intervention and any long-term health issues that follow.

You can make a No Win, No Fee compensation claim with the help and support of a specialist clinical negligence solicitor.

With over 13,000 clinical negligence claims a year, you're not alone

Dehydration is often a result of hospital negligence and can lead to a clinical negligence claim.

13,511 new clinical negligence claims were referred to NHS Resolution in 2022/23 (resolution.nhs.uk).

It is estimated that one in eight elderly care home residents admitted to hospital are suffering from dehydration through lack of fluids.

There are over 500,000 cases of acute kidney injury (AKI) every year, ;leading to around 100,000.due to severe dehydration. Around half of these are considered excess deaths and potentially avoidable with proper hydration. (Think Kidneys).

If you decide to make a hospital dehydration claim, your medical negligence solicitor will take you through every step of the claims process. Your solicitor will be with you until you win your claim and get the compensation you need to move forward.

See also:

Medical negligence claims

Care home injury claims

Am I entitled to make a hospital dehydration claim?

You have the right to claim compensation if the care you received did not meet the appropriate standard of care, and you were injured by this negligent treatment.

Find out online if you can claim with our injury claim calculator. Or you can call 0800 376 1001 to speak to a specialist advisor. Find out in minutes if you have a claim.

How long do I have to make a hospital dehydration claim?

You usually have 3 years to make a hospital dehydration claim. The timelimit starts from the date you discovered you were injured by negligent care (the date of knowledge).

For injured children, a claim can be started by a parent or guardian at any time before the child turns 18. Thereafter, the injured individual has until their 21st birthday to make a claim on their own.

How much compensation can I claim for a hospital dehydration?

The amount of money you could claim for your injury will depend on:

  • the seriousness of your injury, and
  • any financial losses or costs you have incurred.

At the start of your claim, your solicitor will consider the many ways your injuries have affected your life. Your solicitor will take these considerations into account to calculate the correct compensation award.

Hospital dehydration compensation calculator

Get an accurate compensation estimate (including for multiple injuries), confirm your legal position, and check if you have a No Win, No Fee claim.

Updated July 2024 Compensation Calculator v3.04

General damages

General damages are awarded for pain, suffering and loss of amenity (PSLA).

Awards for general damages are set by the Judicial College (judiciary.uk) and published in their guidelines for personal injury awards.

How is compensation calculated if I have multiple injuries?

Special damages

Special damages is compensation awarded to cover any financial losses and expenses you incur as a result of your hospital dehydration or negligent medical treatment. These damages aim to put you back in the financial position you would have been in, had your injury not occurred.

Special damages will also cover your medical treatment expenses, that might include intravenous fluids, nutritional support and.

Read more:

A complete list of recoverable losses in a personal injury claim

How do patients become dehydrated?

Dehydration occurs where a person's fluid output exceeds their fluid input. For example if patients lose fluid - through prolonged vomiting or diarrhoea, or through high fevers causing sweating - they are likely to become dehydrated if that lost fluid is not replaced.

What are the signs and symptoms of dehydration?

A person with dehydration may display a number of symptoms; decreased urine output and a dry mouth are an early indication. Muscle cramps, nausea and light-headedness are also common signs. If dehydration is severe a patient may become confused and weak and may eventually fall into a coma.

Proper standards of care in residential homes and hospitals should ensure that these signs are noticed and treated quickly to prevent deterioration of the condition.

Although mild to moderate dehydration in older people may difficult to detect, it can be confirmed by simple tests to measure the level of sodium and other electrolytes in the blood. These should be carried out where dehydration is suspected.

How is dehydration treated?

Dehydration may be treated by simply ensuring a patient drinks plenty of fluid to replace that which has been lost. If a patient is too ill or weak to drink, fluids and electrolytes may be administered intravenously (IV) through a drip.

Care home staff and medical professionals have a duty of care to ensure that residents and patients are given sufficient fluids to prevent dehydration, or to rehydrate where the condition has already presented.

What happens if a patient's dehydration is left untreated?

Dehydration may lead to high concentrations of sodium in the blood, a condition known as hypernatraemia. Some drugs and hormonal conditions may also increase the level of sodium in the blood.

Patients may develop a condition known as acute kidney injury (AKI). Known as "the silent killer" it may go unnoticed by medical staff. AKI causes a loss of kidney function and can progress very quickly.

Although older people are particularly vulnerable, younger patients may also be affected, with one in 25 of all hospital inpatients under the age of 40 developing the condition.

Patients who survive AKI may be left with permanent health problems and the risk of developing chronic kidney disease. Around 5-10% of patients never regain full renal function, and may require lifelong dialysis or a kidney transplant.

Can I claim for medical negligence?

Whether in a care home, NHS or private hospital, keeping patients hydrated is the most basic requirement of good healthcare practice.

If that basic care has fallen below standard and resulted in the patient becoming ill through dehydration, then a claim may be brought for medical negligence.

Clinical negligence claims

Hospital dehydration-related injuries are usually categorised as clinical negligence. Click on the icon below for more information.

No win, no fee hospital dehydration compensation claims

With no win, no fee, you can claim hospital dehydration compensation without financial risk. If your claim isn't successful, you pay nothing. If you win, you only pay a pre-agreed percentage of your compensation.

Find out more about how no win, no fee claims work

Get expert advice now

Interested in talking to a medical negligence specialist about your claim?

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Citations

Source: (reviewed: 10/12/2023)

Gaynor Haliday, Legal researcher

Author:
Gaynor Haliday, Legal researcher