Warehouse Injury Compensation Claims

If your life, or the life of a loved one, has been affected by a warehouse accident, we can help.

If your injuries were caused by your employer or a co-worker, you may be entitled to claim compensation.

Claiming injury compensation with a solicitor

You can make a work accident compensation claim with the help and support of a personal injury solicitor.

Your solicitor will ask you about what happened, and they will collect evidence to prove what caused your injuries. Your solicitor will also work out how much money you can claim, based on your injuries, lost earnings and other expenses. By law, your employer will have insurance to cover the cost of injury claims, and your compensation will be paid out of this policy.

We can help you make a work accident claim on a No Win No Fee basis.

In this article

    Introduction

    A warehouse can contain many hazards that could cause injury. Warehouse accidents have resulted in forklift truck accident claims, claims for falling object-related injuries and claims following slip and trip accidents.

    These work accident claims commonly succeed if it can be demonstrated that the employer or operator of the warehouse premises breached health and safety regulations or other legislation.

    Common warehouse accidents

    Slips, trips and falls

    If warehouse goods or equipment are not stored safely and correctly, they can create hazards and result in injuries from people slipping, tripping or falling. Items that can result in accidents from tripping or falling include:

    • Poorly discarded packaging or strapping
    • Improperly stored goods - for example boxes sticking out into aisles

    Warehouse staff may also slip on things such as:

    • Spilt liquids like paint, water or oil that have not been cleaned up properly
    • Slippery items like plastic packaging

    Claims for slips, trips and falls in warehouses are often made following injuries including bruises, lacerations and fractures. Claims for serious head, spine and crush injuries are likely to include compensation for long-term care and treatment costs.

    Falling Objects

    If items in a warehouse are not stored properly on high shelves or pallets, they present a risk to warehouse workers. Even small objects pose a real risk of injury.

    The premises should be inspected on a regular basis to ensure the risk of such accidents is appropriately managed. If these checks have not occurred, and an injury occurs, a subsequent claim has a good chance of success.

    Falls from height

    Workers are often required to work at height in warehouses, stacking goods on shelves or retrieving items stored at height. Some employees may work from elevated machinery such as cherry pickers. Working from ladders or elevated platforms means there is a risk of employees falling and being injured.

    The Work at Height Regulations 2005 (amended in 2007) are intended to protect everyone who is required to work at height. The regulations state that employers should avoid asking workers to work at heights wherever possible. If working at height is unavoidable, safety equipment should be used to prevent falls from height. Employers should also ensure that employees are thoroughly trained for working at height.

    Manual Handling Injuries

    Lifting and moving heavy objects is a common requirement for staff in warehouses. But lifting or moving heavy or large objects can result in back injuries, sprains, injured muscles, and foot injuries from dropping items.

    The Manual Handling Operations Regulation 1992 (amended in 2002) are designed to protect workers from injuries resulting from manual handling. Employers are required to eliminate any manual handling that is not completely necessary. This might require the introduction of machinery and lifting equipment like forklift trucks, winches and leverage devices.

    Employers must carry out a risk assessment of all manual handling that cannot be eliminated and which may cause injury. Employers are also required to reduce the risk of injury from manual handling as much as possible.

    Personal Protective Equipment at Work (Amendment) Regulations 2022

    These regulations came into force on 6 April 2022. Employers have an obligation to provide free Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) to all workers, including workers who are self-employed or on a zero-hours contract.

    Under the previous 1992 regulations, employers were only required to provide PPE to employees with a formal employment contract.

    Typical PPE issued to warehouse workers can include safety goggles, hard hats, protective gloves, overalls, steel toe cap boots and high vis jackets.

    If you are injured while working in a warehouse and your employer failed to provide you with suitable PPE, you may be entitled to claim compensation - even if you are self-employed.

    Do I have an injury claim?

    It should be possible to make an injury claim if you were injured:

    • in the last 3 years and;
    • someone else was to blame.

    Even if these two points don't apply to you, you may still be able to make a claim.

    To find out for sure, speak to a legally trained adviser on 0800 376 1001.

    A brief phone consultation will tell you exactly where you stand. There is no obligation to start a claim.

    Will I have to go to court?

    Highly unlikely. Solicitors settle the vast majority of claims out of court.

    Less than 5% of personal injury claims go to court. Generally, only very complex cases, or those where liability cannot be resolved, end up in court.

    Cases that do ultimately go to court are decided by a judge or magistrate, not a jury.

    Even if the claim does go to court, it is very unlikely you will have to attend.

    Read more:

    Will my injury claim go to court and what if it does?

    Do I need a diagnosis to make a warehouse injury claim?

    If you have been injured and are awaiting the results, you should still seek legal advice as soon as possible. The sooner you start a warehouse injury claim after an accident, the more likely your claim is to succeed.

    No win, no fee - the facts

    'No win, no fee' means that if your injury claim is unsuccessful, you will not have to pay any legal fees whatsoever. Known as a 'Conditional Fee Agreement' or 'CFA', no win, no fee is a contract entered into between you (the 'claimant') and your solicitor.

    Our no win, no fee guarantee

    Our no win, no fee guarantee means there is zero financial risk in making an injury claim - even if you don't win your claim. Read more about making a No win, no fee claim

    What do I pay if I win my injury claim?

    Your injury solicitor will receive a success fee which is deducted from your compensation, once your claim is settled. The solicitor's success fee can be up to 25%. You and your solicitor can agree the success fee before you start your claim.

    What do I pay if I do not win my injury claim?

    If your injury claim is not successful then you do not have to pay any legal fees whatsoever. Your solicitor may take out insurance to ensure there will be nothing to pay.

    Is there a catch?

    The Conditional Fee Agreement (CFA) sets out the terms between you and your solicitor., No Win No Fee is a regulated activity and as such there should be no nasty surprises in the agreement. Nevertheless, it is recommended that you read the agreement carefully and ask any questions if you are unsure.

    How we can help you

    Your solicitor will fight for the best possible compensation settlement for you, and the highly-experienced panel of solicitors have an excellent track record of winning work accident claims.

    If you have any questions, or would like to start a No Win No Fee claim, we are open:

    • 8am to 9pm weekdays
    • 9am to 6pm on Saturday
    • 9.30am to 5pm on Sunday

    Call us for FREE advice on 0800 376 1001, or arrange a call back from a friendly, legally-trained advisor:

    Call me back
    • Tick icon FREEconsultation
    • Tick icon Find outif you can claim
    • Tick icon No obligationto start a claim

    Injury FAQ's

    Can I claim for someone else?

    Yes. In certain circumstances, it is possible to claim compensation on behalf of another person in the capacity of a 'litigation friend'.

    If an injured person is either too young or vulnerable, too injured or otherwise unable to claim on their own behalf, their litigation friend can handle the claim process on behalf of the injured person.

    The litigation friend will be responsible for communicating with the solicitors, and for making decisions in respect of the claim.

    Read more:

    Claiming on behalf of another person.

    Can I claim if I feel I was partly responsible for my accident?

    Yes. You may still be able to claim compensation even if your actions may have contributed to the accident.

    However, if you were partly to blame (known as contributory negligence), your compensation may be reduced and it may be more difficult to prove liability.

    Read more:

    Claiming compensation if you were partly responsible for an accident.

    How long do I have to make an injury claim?

    In general, you have a time limit of up to 3 years from the date of the injury to make an injury claim.

    The last date you can make a claim is known as the claim limitation date - after which your injury claim becomes 'statute barred'.

    Can I claim for an injury after 3 years?

    Possibly. The general rule for adults is that a claim must be started within three years.

    However, the three-year countdown starts on the day you learned of your injury or illness. This will usually be the date of the accident, but could be the date your doctor gave you a diagnosis.

    There other circumstances that can also impact the limitation date. Call us now on 0800 376 1001 to find out if you are still able to claim injury compensation.

    In reality, there are a number of factors that can affect whether an injury claim will be taken on by a solicitor.

    Calculate your claim limitation date

    Will I have to go to a solicitor's office?

    No. You will not need visit a solicitor's office. Personal injury claims are handled by email, post and phone.

    Should you need to have a medical, this will be arranged at a medical centre near you or at your GP's surgery.

    Read more:

    Will I have to visit a solicitor's office?

    I need the money now - what are my options?

    If you are unable to work and have bills to pay, you may be able to claim an interim compensation payment.

    An interim payment is an advance on your compensation payment. Any amount you receive in interim payments would be deducted from your final compensation payment.

    Read more:

    How to I get an interim compensation payment?

    Gaynor Haliday, Legal researcher

    Author:
    Gaynor Haliday, Legal researcher