If a roofer injury has set you back, we'll help you move forward

Roofer injuries from falls or tool-related accidents can be severe, leading to claims for comprehensive medical treatment and lost earnings.

If your life, or the life of a loved one, has been affected by an accident at work, we can help. If your injuries were caused by your employer or a co-worker, you may be entitled to claim compensation.

You can make a No Win, No Fee work accident compensation claim with the help and support of a personal injury solicitor.

With over 60,000 roofing injuries each year, you are not alone

If you're a roofer who has suffered an injury on the job, it's important to know that you are not alone.

Roofers face a high risk of workplace injuries due to the nature of the job. Working at heights, handling heavy materials, and exposure to the elements can lead to a variety of accidents and injuries, from falls and slips to muscle strains and equipment-related harm.

Across the UK, there are approximately 64,000 roofers are injured each year (nfrc.co.uk).

Am I eligible for roofer injury compensation?

You will be able to claim compensation if you've been injured or diagnosed with an illness in the last three years and it wasn't your fault.

Find out online if you can claim with our injury claim calculator. Or you can call 0800 376 1001 to speak to a specialist advisor. Find out in minutes if you have a claim.

What if the accident was partly my fault?

Attributing blame for an accident isn't always clear-cut.

In our 2024 Work Injury Claimant Survey, we found that 26.02% of injured workers felt they had at least some responsibility for the injuries they sustained.

A claim could still be possible if your actions contributed to your injury. If you were injured on the job by a co-worker's actions, you can still claim compensation from your employer, based on the principle of vicarious liability.

Read more:

Can I claim if I feel I was partly responsible for my accident?

How much compensation can I claim for a roofer injury?

The amount of money you could claim for your injury will depend on:

  • the seriousness of your injury, and
  • any financial losses or costs you have incurred.

At the start of your claim, your solicitor will consider the many ways your injuries have affected your life. Your solicitor will take these considerations into account to calculate the correct compensation award.

Roofer injury compensation calculator

Get an accurate compensation estimate (including for multiple injuries), confirm your legal position, and check if you have a No Win, No Fee claim.

Updated May 2024 Compensation Calculator v3.04

General damages

General damages are awarded for pain, suffering and loss of amenity (PSLA).

Awards for general damages are set by the Judicial College (judiciary.uk) and published in their guidelines for personal injury awards.

How is compensation calculated if I have multiple injuries?

Special damages

Special damages is compensation for quantifiable financial losses you've incurred as a result of your roofer injury. Compensation can include loss of income, including future loss of income, and any additional expenses directly related to your injury.

These damages will also cover any medical or treatment bills, such as physical therapy, diagnostic imaging tests and surgical intervention.

Read more:

A complete list of recoverable losses in a personal injury claim

Psychological harm and accidents in the workplace

In addition to physical injuries, a work accident can inflict lasting psychological harm.

Our 2024 Work Injury Claimant Survey reveals the extent of psychological trauma, with 25.00% of claims involving a psychological injury, 64.09% of which related to a physical injury.

Roofer injuries, especially from falls, can result in a long-lasting phobia of heights (acrophobia) and general anxiety about working at elevation.

Even after your physical recovery or rehabiliation is complete, hidden psychological injuries can take longer to heal.

A specialist solicitor will ensure that the psychological harm you have suffered is considered when calculating your compensation. This can be vital to ensure you receive mental health support and other therapies that may not be readily available on the NHS in your area.

Our compensation calculator can estimate your compensation for psychological injuries. Or you can call us on 0800 376 1001 to speak to a specialist advisor.

Working at height

The Work at Height Regulations 2005 sets out detailed information on how to safely carry out roofing work for those building, maintaining, cleaning, demolishing and inspecting roofs.

Before work commences each project should be risk assessed by the employer, as the nature of the precautions needed may vary from one job to another. An employer must require staff to adhere to suitable safety standards is essential even if the work only involves a brief inspection or minor adjustment to a television aerial.

Inadequate health and safety measures are likely to be strong evidence of an employers' negligence.

Read more:

Health and safety breach injury claims

Suitable equipment

Appropriate equipment should be provided at all times. This may include scaffolding, edge guards and safety nets. Some tasks may be carried out more safely by using a crane or cherry picker to gain access to the roof.

In addition to falls from the edges of roofs, accidents also occur where workers fall through gaps and holes in a roof, or through fragile roofs and skylights, and the risks apply to both flat and pitched roofs. Suitable scaffolding and other equipment should be used to protect roofers against these risks.

Keeping the site tidy

Debris and other material should be removed from a roof through enclosed chutes or by lowering to the ground in containers. It should not be allowed to accumulate into piles which could fall, create trip hazards or put pressure on the roof, increasing the risk of a collapse.

Covered walkways or debris netting will also protect other workers from injury from any falling objects.

Suitable training

Workers should be trained in the use of all equipment and processes they will be expected to use and adhere to. This includes the installation and use of safety equipment, and how to safely handle materials.

By law, employers cannot rely on staff ‘pick up safety on the job' and inexperienced workers must be under a suitable level of supervision of someone who has the necessary competency.

The appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) should always be provided and should be worn by the worker. This would usually include hard hats and safety boots for general work, also safety glasses to protect the eyes from dust and other particles. Safety gloves may be necessary to protect workers using equipment such as blow torches or hot materials - bitumen for example - from burns and scalds.

Lifting and handling

Injuries may be sustained by roofers who need to carry heavy tools, equipment and supplies. Working in awkward spaces may make lifting and handling techniques difficult, so risks should be assessed and safe handling practices established.

Your employer's 'duty of care'

All employers have a duty to ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable, the health, safety and welfare of their employees.

By following the procedures set out by the Work at Height Regulations 2005 and Health and Safety at Work Act 1974. an employer should ensure that the risk of his employees being injured is minimised.

Where the risks have not been properly assessed and identified and the necessary equipment, appropriate precautions and systems of work provided and correctly implemented, accidents may occur and the employer may be found negligent as a result.

Personal Protective Equipment at Work (Amendment) Regulations 2022

The Personal Protective Equipment at Work (Amendment) Regulations 2022 came into force on 6 April 2022.

This legislation means that employers have an obligation to provide free Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) to all workers, including workers who are self-employed or on a zero-hours contract.

Under the previous 1992 regulations, employers were only required to provide PPE to employees with a formal employment contract.

If you are injured at work and your employer failed to provide you with suitable PPE, you may be entitled to claim compensation - even if you are self-employed.

Roofing contractor claims

Claiming for compensation as a roofing building site contractor can be more complicated in some respects, but the company or other party responsible for managing safety on a site is held to many of the same standards as an employer and it is often still possible to claim compensation.

If you were injured as a self-employed worker or contractor, contact our team on 0800 376 1001 for more information.

See also:

Building site contractor injury claims

Employers' liability claims claims

Work accident claims are also known as employers' liability claims. Click on the icons below for more information:

No win, no fee roofer injury compensation claims

With no win, no fee, you can claim roofer injury compensation without financial risk. If your claim isn't successful, you pay nothing. If you win, you only pay a pre-agreed percentage of your compensation.

Find out more about how no win, no fee claims work

Get expert advice now

Interested in talking to a work accident specialist about your claim?

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Call 0800 376 1001

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Citations

Chris Salmon, Director

Author:
Chris Salmon, Director