Swimming pool accident and illness

Compensation of £12,500 was awarded in 2000 to a 36 year-old woman who suffered head and back injuries after slipping on wet tiles in an accident at a swimming pool.

Injury Details

The Claimant, who was aged 30 at the time at which the incident took place, slipped on an area of wet flooring next to a swimming pool.

She fell and her head hit the tiling at enough force to knock her into a state of temporary unconsciousness. She also sustained a slipped disc in her back upon impact.

In the subsequent week she was proscribed medication to nullify the continual pain in her back and neck. She suffered from soreness in her ears and experienced frequent headaches.

She was recommended a program of physiotherapy over the following months, however this failed to reduce the severity of her symptoms and her condition remained poor. She suffered considerable pain and struggled to perform daily tasks in caring for her children.

The pain was so severe that both her mobility and her sleep had become disrupted by her injuries, despite the fact that she was still taking strong painkillers and medication.

An MRI scan showed that she had sustained a disc protrusion in her left side.

In spite of her commitment to further physiotherapy, drug treatment and injections, the prognosis was that her condition would never improve to its pre-accident state and would remain poor for the discernible future.

The Claimant was left deeply frustrated by her inability to both return to work and maintain a busy and active lifestyle as a mother of three.

Award

She never returned to work and as such the basis of her claim was for loss of past and future earnings.

At the hearing in London Queen's Bench Division he was awarded damages for such loss sustained during the seven year period between the date of the incident and the trial, and for a thirteen year period thereafter, the time estimated to constitute what would have been the remainder of her working career.

Damages totalling £12,500 were awarded to the Claimant.