£10,500 for ruptured Achilles tendon in car accident

In 2012 compensation of £10,500 was awarded to a 53 year old man for a ruptured Achilles tendon sustained a year earlier while helping a woman who had lost control of her car.

Injury details

The Claimant noticed a female motorist in distress who had lost control of her vehicle while attempting to bump-start it. The car had rolled into a tree. The lady was shouting for help trapped between the car and the car door.

The man attempted to push her vehicle backwards so as to free her. As he did so there was a sudden snap just above his left ankle.

He could not move his foot or control it and he suffered from a sudden intense pain above the left ankle.

The Claimant went to A&E where he was diagnosed with a ruptured Achilles tendon. His leg was placed in a below-knee plaster and he was admitted to a ward. He had surgery to repair the ruptured tendon. He stayed in hospital for 2 days after the surgery.

He was unable to bear any weight on his leg for eight weeks and wore a below-knee cast for the whole of this time. After the cast was removed he wore a plastic boot for two weeks and used crutches to move around.

Three months after the accident he was able to put weight on his ankle again. A course of physiotherapy was then necessary for two months to restore full use.

The Claimant was unable to work for three months. He still suffered minor symptoms nine months after the accident and would be left with scarring from his surgery.

Allegation

It was alleged that the driver of the car was negligent insofar as they lost control of their vehicle endangering themselves and those around them.

The Claimant was injured trying to aid the driver. The driver losing control of their vehicle directly caused the injury suffered.

The man was unable to work for three months. He was left with residual discomfort and scarring.

Conclusion and settlement

Lliability was not admitted and the matter proceeded to Court for settlement.

Compensation of £10,500 was awarded by way of a Court award.

The damages were attributed entirely to "pain, suffering and loss of amenity."